Doughnuts & Documentaries for June 2016 Our Birds and Their Uncertain Future

Our Birds: In Wisconsin Special: Wednesday, June 8, 10:00 a.m.

Our Birds takes us on the perilous journey Wisconsin’s migratory birds face every year. Join us on Wednesday, June 8, at 10:00 a.m., as we learn about the birds of Wisconsin and their uncertain future. The film explores the connections between Wisconsin and Costa Rica’s Corcovado National Park and also discusses the perils faced by migrating birds and the innovative methods being used to save them. Our Birds is also part of Wisconsin Public Television’s In Wisconsin series.

You are invited to join us afterwards for an informal discussion with coffee and doughnuts provided by Friends of Waukesha Public Library. More details are available through the Reference Desk at 262-524-3682.

May Doughnuts and Documentaries

A Doughnuts and Documentaries Event

Birds of Wisconsin: In Wisconsin Special

Wednesday, May 11, 10:00 a.m.

Wisconsin is home to nearly 300 birding locations, making it an exceptional bird watching habitat. Only in Wisconsin can you see all 15 species of cranes or find the nation’s largest freshwater cattail marsh. On Wednesday, May 11, at 10:00 a.m., Birds of Wisconsin takes us on a high-flying journey across the state as it brings us the stories of Wisconsin’s birds and the people who care for them. This documentary is part of Wisconsin Public Television’s In Wisconsin series.

You are invited to join us afterwards for an informal discussion with coffee and doughnuts provided by Friends of Waukesha Public Library. More details are available through the Reference Desk, by calling 262-524-3682.

April Doughnuts & Documentaries – Cool It!

Cool It!

Wednesday, April 13, 2016, 10:00 a.m.

Waukesha Public Library’s April 13 documentary asks when it comes to global warming: “are we saving the world or just burning money?” Cool It is author Bjorn Lomborg’s controversial response to the film An Inconvenient Truth by Al Gore. Cool It asks whether the many elaborate actions being considered to stop global warming are worth the cost. Lomborg is best known for his book, The Skeptical Environmentalist, in which he suggested that environmentalists have diverted potentially beneficial resources to less deserving environmental issues in ways that were economically damaging and with little impact on global warming. The program begins at 10:00 a.m. and you are invited to join us afterwards for an informal discussion with coffee and doughnuts provided by Friends of Waukesha Public Library.

March Doughnuts & Documentaries – The Brain: Who Will We Be?

In this episode of PBS’ The Brain: Who Will We Be?, Dr. David Eagleman gives us an amazing glimpse into ongoing research of the future possibilities of how our brains, and even our longevity, may change and evolve. Join us on Wednesday, March 9, at 10:00 a.m. as we find out what’s next for the human brain and our species. What if technology develops a way to upload our brains into digital space? And, if we achieve that, what will that mean for us – as individuals and as a society?

Dr. Eagleman is a neuroscientist and a New York Times best-selling author of the books Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain and the best selling fiction book: Sum. He directs the Laboratory for Perception and Action at the Baylor College of Medicine, where he also directs the Initiative on Neuroscience and Law. These documentaries are part of the PBS series, The Brain with David Eagleman.

You are invited to join us afterwards for an informal discussion with coffee and doughnuts provided by Friends of Waukesha Public Library.

February Doughnuts & Documentaries – The Brain: What Makes Me?

February’s documentary, The Brain: What makes Me?, explores the question of how the brain gives rise to our thoughts, emotions, memories and personality. The process of becoming a fully developed human takes a long time: from cradle to grave, we are works in progress. In this film, Dr. David Eagleman explores memory as an important pillar of self and reveals that rather than being a faithful record of our past, memory is fallible and often unreliable, making our life of memories more personal mythology than digital recording.

The documentary is part of the PBS series, The Brain with David Eagleman. Dr. Eagleman is a neuroscientist and a New York Times best-selling author of the books Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain and the best selling fiction book: Sum. He directs the Laboratory for Perception and Action at the Baylor College of Medicine, where he also directs the Initiative on Neuroscience and Law.

The documentary is followed by an informal discussion. Coffee and doughnuts are provided by Friends of Waukesha Public Library.